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Franklin Fibre Blog Post

Stanley Black & Decker Rocket Launch  - blog post image
  • Franklin Fibre Lamitex
  • 23 Apr 2018

Stanley Black & Decker Rocket Launch

Congratulations and many thanks to Stanley Black & Decker on the successful launch of their rocket April 7th, 2018! Helping our customers to reach their goals is something we take pride in at Franklin Fibre-Lamitex Corp., and receiving videos of our products in motion is always a welcome bonus. 

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Effect of Radiation on Industrial composites - blog post image
  • Franklin Fibre Lamitex
  • 22 Mar 2018

Effect of Radiation on Industrial composites

Lamitex ® industrial composites supply a wide range of insulation duties for common electrical, heat exchange, and cryogenic industries. However, they are not often thought of for their ability to insulate against common radiation emitted by nuclear reactors and medical machines. Typically concrete, lead, steel and ceramic are the common materials for nuclear devices and nuclear waste disposal facilities. The areas of the facilities that consist of these materials are often seen as heavy and poor in corrosion resistance & mechanical properties. We aim to change that by offering composites that can reduce the weight of insulation while maintaining higher mechanicals when exposed to γ (gamma) radiation. All tests referenced in this blog were conducted using 60Co, which is a synthetic radioactive isotope commonly used in the medical field as a treatment for cancer. 

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Basalt Composites: Setting The Standard for Cryogenic Insulation - blog post image
  • Franklin Fibre Lamitex
  • 20 Feb 2018

Basalt Composites: Setting The Standard for Cryogenic Insulation

Basalt is an extrusive igneous rock that is formed when lava is exhumed from a volcano and cools rapidly on the surface of the earth so that only smaller crystals are able to form. It is the most common volcanic rock on the planet; lining the oceanic crust as well as many of the volcanic islands. However, in order to turn this volcanic rock into a cloth to be made into a composite material it must go through a separation and extrusion process. Interestingly enough, it is processed much like steel. The raw material is melted, poured into a teapot shaped vessel (skimmer) where most impurities are separated by differences in specific gravity and (like slag from steel), forced out the teapot spout, and then extruded into filaments.  

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